SUSUMU KOYAMA CHOCOLOGY 2017 | es koyama OFFICIAL WEBSITE

SALON DU CHOCOLAT 2017
es koyama SALON DU CHOCOLAT 2017 entry chocolat
SUSUMU KOYAMA CHOCOLOGY 2017

HARU --Rouge et vert--

HARU --Rouge et vert--

The flavor of fresh “fukinoto” (butterbur sprout) harvested before blooming and the mildly sweet-sour taste of strawberries are mixed into two-layer ganache. The product allows those who eat it to enjoy the mixture of flavors of materials harvested in spring. While the “Fukinoto” chocolate product that was submitted for the 2012 contest had bitter taste, in producing HARU -- Rouge et vert --, Koyama paid close attention to harmony between the mildly sweet-sour taste of strawberries and the natural flavor of fresh fukinoto harvested on the outskirts of Sanda, Hyogo Prefecture.

Arbre des Dieux --Lindera--

Arbre des Dieux --Lindera--

Arbre des Dieux -- Lindera is a chocolate product that has the elegant flavor of Lindera umbellata known as a “divine tree.” Koyama achieved his long-cherished goal of producing chocolate products containing the flavor of Lindera umbellata by infusing the tree’s branches and leaves taken during the time of a new moon in fresh cream and mixing oil extracted from the tree into the product.

YUZU --Touche de chaleur avec piment d'Espelette--

YUZU --Touche de chaleur avec piment d'Espelette--

YUZU -- Touche de chaleur avec piment d'Espelette -- is a “yuzu” (Japanese citrus)-based praline whose splendid flavor is impressive. Those who try the praline will gradually feel the flavor of spicy Espelette pepper as well as the sour taste and flavor of yuzu for a while after eating it. They will then feel the mild flavor of Almond Praline, Italy. By peeling the surface skin of yuzu that is as thin as 0.1 millimeter and processing it into powder, Koyama succeeded in creating such a highly unique chocolate praline.

San Martin --Voyage sans fin en quête du cacao--

San Martin --Voyage sans fin en quête du cacao--

Nara-zuke are a kind of Japanese pickled daikon radish, usually having a sharp tang, of which the mirin-zuke type originating in Kyoto has a smoother, more rounded flavor. To this wonderful food, arising from processes of fermentation and maturation, I applied the Japanese cutting-edge technique of “instantaneous high-temperature, high-pressure pressing,” in which ingredients are pressed for one to three seconds at temperatures of over 200 degrees Celsius, transforming them into flake form. The main ingredients are homemade praline made with Piedmont hazelnuts, retaining their original crunchy texture, and Costa Rican single-origin 40% cacao au lait, which are given hidden, exotic taste dimensions by mixing with freeze-dried mango, made especially for the occasion, and a thin layer under the coating on the top and bottom of chocolate made by mixing fermented cacao with passion-fruit puree and then fermenting a second time. The tartness gives delicacy to the full, three-dimensional flavor balance.
The décor conveys an image of a daikon radish plucked from the earth and melting into chocolate.

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